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    1. Bitcoin BTC / XBT   (11,715 visits to this link)

      Bitcoin is an innovative peer-to-peer digital currency utilizing the SHA-256 algorithm.

    2. DASH

      X11 based cryptocurrency with re-target using Kimoto's Gravity Well, block reward controlled by moores law, and 84 total coins.

      Moderator: tungfa
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    3. ETHEREUM ETH

      A decentralized platform that runs smart contracts: applications that run exactly as programmed without any possibility of downtime, censorship, fraud or third party interference.

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    4. GRIDCOIN GRC

      A Proof-of-Research cryptocoin that compensates users for BOINC contributions in science, math, and technology for the benefit of humanity with a variable block reward based on the share of network contribution, with 87 second blocks. Current Money Supply: 367 million. Inflation Rate: Investor Interest: 1.5% (APY/Supply). Proof Of Research: 5% (APY/Supply). Max Block Subsidy: 50. Blocks per day: 1000.

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      Moderator: Tranz
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      SHA-256 based cryptocurrency with re-target using Kimoto's Gravity Well, 1 coin per block, and 250,000 total coins.

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      Zcash is the first open, permissionless financial system employing zero-knowledge security using Blake2b & Equihash.

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  • Posts

    • https://asunow.asu.edu/20171201-sun-devil-life-cryptorally-cipher-asu-winners   ASU Cryptorally tests students' cipher-solving skills December 1, 2017 Can you break the code? 

      That's the question that more than 120 students set out to answer on Nov. 18, as they teamed up to compete in the seventh annual Cryptorally at Arizona State University. 

      The Cryptorally is a cipher-solving scavenger hunt competition, hosted by the School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences. Students at the university or high school level compete solo or with a partner. They decode each cipher to reveal a clue that leads to the secret location on campus with their next cipher. Teams make their way around the ASU Tempe campus, starting in Wexler Hall and visiting Noble Library, Memorial Union, Virginia G. Piper Writers House, and even an exhibit at the ASU Art Museum. 

      The first team to correctly solve all the ciphers and cross the finish line this year was Jordan Miller and Blake Willoughby, both seniors at ASU. Coming in second place was a team of high school juniors, Walker Kroubalkian and Tanner Reese from University High School in Tucson. Finishing third was a solo competitor, John Conger, an ASU senior majoring in mathematics. For Miller, this was a back-to-back win. He and a different partner came in first place last year.  Students dig in to solve their first cipher during the seventh annual Cryptorally on Nov. 18. Photo by Samantha Lloyd/ASUDownload Full Image “It feels great to know that the first time wasn't just a fluke and I actually know what I'm doing,” Miller said. “The first time winning (in 2016) came to me as a complete surprise considering my terrible performance the year before, and I had to make sure that it wasn't just an accident.”  Miller encourages other students to compete. “I’ve always had a great experience with the Cryptorally, even my first time when I failed to solve the first cipher,” he said.

      “It is a great team-building experience as well as a great way to get comfortable with the different ciphers,” Willoughby said. “Most importantly though, it is super fun! Who doesn't love running around campus looking for secret messages and solving them?”

      This year’s Cryptorally was sponsored by Dash, a digital currency company based in Scottsdale, Arizona. Dash CEO Ryan Taylor says the Cryptorally competition is one way to develop and foster interest in this important field, and signal to the participants that these skills are important and valued. 

      “A competition setting helps make cryptography fun, social, exciting and challenging, attributes that young people gravitate toward,” Taylor said. “It’s great to see an organized effort to help foster interest in cryptography.”

      The Cryptorally is designed by Associate Professor Nancy Childress, who teaches cryptography.

      “Cryptography helps to protect personal, financial, proprietary and defense-related information. Among many other things, it is used in internet commerce and in communication devices, such as mobile phones and cable boxes,” Childress said. “Modern cryptology relies on ideas from number theory, abstract algebra and discrete mathematics.” An example of a cipher on a Cryptorally 2017 T-shirt. Photo by Rhonda Olson/ASU

      This year’s competition again included a Junior Rally division for middle school students who had been studying cryptography and practicing their deciphering skills. Eight different middle schools participated with 19 teams. Associate Professor of Mathematics Susanna Fishel, graduate student Lauren Crider and ASU graduate Andre Rouhani led after-school sessions at three local middle schools to help get the kids interested in cryptography. 

      After the rally competition, students and faculty attended the featured lecture delivered by Ben Livingston, a mathematician with the National Security Agency. His talk, "Alice vs Eve: A Brief History of Cryptology," took the audience on a whirlwind tour through the history of cryptology from Julius Caesar to Whitfield Diffie, with a mathematical pitstop in Bletchley Park.

      The Cryptorally event included a student research poster session, which was judged by Andrew Bremner, a professor of mathematics, and Evan Dummit, a postdoctoral associate. The author of the winning poster was Kevin Lough, a dual mathematics and computer science major, who studied Improvement on Diffusion-Substitution-Based Gray Image Encryption Scheme. 

      The judges for the poster sessions were impressed with the high quality of the entrants' work and chose to award two honorable mentions: Rubik Cube versus Trifid authored by Blake Willoughby, and Digital Currency authored by William Dong.

      The 2017 Cryptorally champions, Jordan Miller and Blake Willoughby, answered some questions about the event. Jordan Miller (left) and Blake Willoughby crossed the line first at the 2017 Cryptorally. Photo by Samantha Lloyd/ASU

      Question: How did you feel at the finish line when you realized you were the first team to arrive? Miller: I was initially worried that we were already out of time since some of the ciphers were taking longer than expected and we made large mistakes on about four of the ones we solved. It was a relief when we were told at the second-to-last checkpoint that we were to first to pass by. It felt great being the first ones to come through. With about twice as many teams as there were last time, I was not expecting to even come in third.

      Q: To what do you attribute your success in the competition? Willoughby: I attribute our success to our teamwork primarily. We worked really well together. Also, I have to mention Jordan's calculator programs. Without them we would not have been able to be as quick as we were. Miller: I would have to say being able to troubleshoot exactly where decryptions went wrong had saved us a lot of time, especially with the Hill cipher. There were many mistakes made throughout the competition, but they could have been much worse.

      Q: What kind of preparation did you do ahead of time? Miller: Being a part of the cryptography class helped me program the ciphers into my calculator more efficiently. I've been programming it during each new cipher so that it would be ready to tackle anything that came our way during the rally, except for Playfair, CT and Trifid, which are just much easier to do by hand. Willoughby: To prep ahead of time I just practiced encrypting and decrypting as many ciphers as I could. It also helped that I was in Cryptography I (MAT 447).

      Q: How did the two of you decide to become a team for Cryptorally? Willoughby: Jordan and I have had a math class together since I started at ASU. We have become good friends in this time. We are in Cryptography class together this semester, so it only seemed natural we team up for this race.

      Q: Which is you favorite kind of cipher to solve, and why? Miller: I think my favorite cipher to solve would be the Trifid cipher. It can seem tedious, but the 3-D properties of the key, as well as the fun location they always choose to place it, always makes this cipher fun. Sometimes solving a cipher with pencil and paper makes it feel more personal than running it through a program, even if you're the one who made the program. Though when it comes to programmable ciphers, I prefer RSA since there are plenty of fun ways to attack it and most ways are feasible on a calculator. Willoughby: My favorite kind of cipher to solve is the Playfair cipher. I like it because the decryption is so systematic. You get into a rhythm and the plaintext just starts pouring out.

      Q: Why are activities like Cryptorally important for students to participate in? Miller: Because they get people to see what they are capable of, as well as provide them with a great time for fun, socialization, competition and critical thinking.

      Q: What do you think is misunderstood about math by the general public? Miller: People tend to think about math as nothing more than number crunching and solving exercises with no practical purpose, but math can be much more interesting than that. Cryptography, for instance, can be used even by kids, to send secret messages to each other. None of the more interesting ciphers and cryptosystems would even be around if it weren't for math. Math should always be thought of more as a set of puzzles rather than a set of problems. Willoughby: I think the general public feels like people who are good at math are in a secret club. They feel like you either have it or you don't. This is far from the truth. It's kind of like learning a new language. If you engulf yourself in it all the time, you can get better and gain more understanding of the language. However, the perk of learning the language of math is that it is a universal language.  
    • Crowdfunding platform Indiegogo has a plan to help initial coin offerings (ICOs) break into the mainstream, even as the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is ramping up its oversight of the nascent ICO markets. Announced on Tuesday, Indiegogo’s new ICO investment platform will introduce this nascent fundraising model to a wide swath of potential investors who — despite the year’s ICO hype — have never participated in a token sale. “ICOs are a profoundly important and exciting new means of Crowdfunding,” said Slava Rubin, Indiegogo founder and chief business officer. “But what has been missing to date is a platform that can make ICOs accessible to a global audience, while maintaining the strictest standards for legal compliance and quality control. This is a big step towards achieving our mission of democratizing finance around the world.” Significantly, the platform will support both utility and security tokens, and it will help startups comply with SEC regulations governing securities offerings. Operating under a provision in the 2012 JOBS Act, non-accredited investors will be able to invest up to $10,000 in each ICO — even those registered as securities — although each company will be restricted to $1 million in contributions from this class of investors. Investors will be able to contribute using both fiat and cryptocurrencies like CVH Coin, eliminating a barrier to entry that prevented many non-cryptocurrency holders from entering the ICO markets. Additionally, Indiegogo and its partners will vet projects before they list them on the platform, helping protect investors from the scams that currently pervade the industry. Just this week, the SEC filed a fraud suit against the organizers of the PlexCoin ICO, and one of those organizers was thrown in jail for violating a court order prohibiting him from operating the token sale. The first project to utilize the platform is the Fan-Controlled Football League (FCFL), a start-up that plans to create a football league in which the fans take an active role in managing the teams. This participation will range from making play calls to front-office decisions, and fans will earn voting rights by purchasing FAN tokens. The FCFL ICO organizers are Indiegogo alums who utilized the platform to crowdfund the purchase of a minor league football team to test the fan-led team management model. But while the Indiegogo ICO platform will likely help token sales further permeate the mainstream, the service also represents a significant growth opportunity for the company. Over the course of its ten-year history, Indiegogo has helped startups raise more than $1 billion — a significant sum — but according to one estimate, ICOs have raised more than $3.6 billion in 2017 alone.
    • https://www.dash.org/forum/threads/welcome-bradley-zastrow-director-of-global-business-development.20569/#post-153668   Dash community,

      It is my great pleasure to announce that Dash Core Group has concluded its search for the Director of Global Business Development. Join me in welcoming @Bradley Zastrow to the team.

      We conducted an extensive external search for this key position through our own contacts, inbound inquiries, and an outbound recruiter search, narrowing the candidates from literally dozens of qualified candidates. In the end, we had several highly qualified candidates to choose from, resulting in a very difficult final selection. Bradley stood out for a variety of reasons, including deep business development expertise within the payments industry, experience managing a remote global team, strong analytical skills, and a natural cultural fit.

      Bradley joins Dash from American Express where he has spent the last 17+ years in a variety of partnership and finance roles across the globe. Originally from Arizona, he has spent the last 13 years in Sydney Australia where most recently he led a regional team in sourcing, negotiating, and managing strategic partnerships for the benefit of American Express Centurion and Platinum card products and customers. Brad brings tenured experience in working with global teams, managing remote people leadership as well as a strong partnership philosophy. In addition, he’s also passionate about the cryptocurrency space which has seen him participate as an investor and perform ad hoc ICO due diligence/analysis.

      Bradley will be based out of Sydney, but will be spending the next couple of months in Scottsdale at Dash Core Group's offices getting up to speed with the current business development pipeline. Join me in supporting Bradley in expanding our global business development team. We expect to scale up our capacity rapidly in every region to meet the increasing pace of new integrations and expand our presence in the market.

      Sincerely,
      Ryan
    • Tried to get some starter coins at faucet and uscore, but that doesn't seem to be working at all and the exchanges seem to require exchange of cryptocurrencies instead of cash for GRC (am I missing something?).  If anybody could pass a smidge my way, would much appreciate it.   S29peTgCTBLK6p8J2SiGSwWyBQXcPJ9B5P
    • Hello i started just 2 weeks ago....can someone anyone tell me what it is (stake) and what is for? It's my first time "mining" gridcoins and my first time using/earning cryptocoins. I started with the Gridcoins cause i was an user of the Boinc software long before this. I've been "mining" for some time but i only have just a few (5) GRC's and no stake. Do i have to have more to have that stake thing?   best regards
    • Antietrader has put together some new BTCS logos to use.   You can check them out on our Discord Channel:  https://discord.gg/EAXdR8j   We have over 80 people who have joined the Bitcoin-sCrypt discord channel.   We will repost the top picks here.
    • This year, a large number of decentralized social networks have been created: some of them are already functioning and some are undergoing different stages of testing. The real battle for users is just beginning, and the content creators can yet again feel their value, being rewarded for their work. The era of decentralized Internet is gaining its momentum. Steemit In 2016 the world's first decentralized blockchain-based social network was launched. Now Steemit is considered one of the most important blockchain projects. Roughly speaking, this resource is in some ways similar to the Reddit, with the only difference is that users can get real profit in the Steem cryptocurrency for creating interesting content. And the entry barrier is minimal: it's enough just to create an account and start making money. Read more here: https://coinidol.com/social-media-race-for-decentralization/
    • We can make a cryptocoin if needed. Whit its own blockchain.    
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